Homemade Lavender Simple Syrup

Homemade Lavender Syrup lends lovely floral flavor to coffees, teas, lemonades, and cocktails. It’s easy to make and perfect for holiday gifting!

glass jar of lavender syrup with gift tag

I tried a lavender latte for the first time several years ago when our local coffee shop offered them as a part of their summer specials. I was skeptical, but I’m a sucker for a special, so I gave it a try.

Two sips later, I was hooked. It was such a soothing latte, with gentle, herby floral notes and just the right amount of sweetness. I knew immediately I was going to need more cozy lavender drinks in my life.

Of course, I couldn’t leave myself at the mercy of the coffee shop’s seasonal specials. Thankfully, it’s a cinch to make Lavender Syrup, and it can be used in a variety of hot and cold beverages all year long.

sauce pot full of water and lavender buds

What is Simple Syrup?

Simple syrups combine water, sugar, and flavorings to create a sweetener for coffees, teas, cocktails, and other beverages. Syrups are used by coffee shops and bartenders, because they effortlessly blend into both hot and cold drinks (no graininess!), and can be made with almost any flavoring you can imagine.

I always keep a bottle of homemade Vanilla Simple Syrup on hand, because it’s so incredibly versatile.

Simple Syrup Ratio

Most simple syrups use either a 1:1 or 1:2 ratio of water to sugar or a 1:2 ratio.

I use simple syrups mostly for coffee and tea, and I find the 1:1 ratio works best for me. It’s easier for me to control the sweetness, and I like that it’s thin enough to be poured easily through a glass oil bottle (this one from World Market is my favorite).

Bartenders often prefer the 1:2 ratio for cocktails, because it adds less water to the drink. Feel free to use this ratio if you prefer!

lavender syrup in a glass jar

How to Make Lavender Simple Syrup

  1. In a sauce pan, combine 3 Tablespoons lavender buds and 1 cup of water. Bring the mixture to a boil, then add the sugar.
  2. Lower the heat so it maintains a gentle boil, and continue to stir until the sugar is dissolved.
  3. Lower the heat to a simmer and allow to simmer for 15 minutes.
  4. Turn off the heat and allow the lavender to steep as it cools. Taste the syrup after 15 minutes. If it has enough flavor, go ahead and strain out the lavender buds. If you want it stronger, continue to steep. I find 20-30 minutes is usually perfect for me.
pitcher pouring lavender syrup through a strainer into a glass jar

>> This recipe makes about 1 cup. Feel free to double the recipe if you prefer!

>> Simple syrup should be stored in an airtight container in the fridge. It will keep for 2-3 weeks.

What kind of lavender should I use for simple syrup?

Lavender syrup can be made with either fresh or dried lavender buds. Unfortunately, my lavender plants didn’t make it this year (sorry lavender, I really tried!), so I opted for dried.

Look for culinary grade lavender, like this one. A bag this size can make MANY batches of syrup and can also be used for fragrant sachets and baked goods.

If you use fresh lavender, choose buds that are fully purple, but not yet opened.

lavender simple syrup in a glass jar

Lavender Syrup Uses

  • Lavender Lattes– Add 1-2 Tablespoons of lavender syrup to 8 ounces of strong brewed coffee. Top with 1/3 cup steamed and frothed milk.
    • Sub 1 Tablespoon honey syrup for 1 Tablespoon lavender syrup in these Honey Lattes for an incredible honey lavender latte.
    • Use 1 Tablespoon Vanilla Syrup for the Lavender Syrup–these two syrups play very well together!
  • London Fog Lattes– This is my absolute FAVORITE use for lavender syrup! Add 1-2 Tablespoons of syrup to 6 ounces brewed Earl Gray tea and top with frothed milk. For more variations and tips, check out how to make tea lattes.
  • Gifts– Package lavender simple syrup in glass jars (this kind or these would be perfect) for holiday gifting! Pair it with a box of Earl Gray Tea and some homemade Canestrelli Cookies for the ultimate tea time gift.
  • Poke holes in this Lemon Zucchini Bread, and brush syrup on top.
  • Add lavender syrup to buttercream frosting to add an herby note to vanilla or lemon cakes.
London Fog Tea Latte with lavender buds on top

More Lavender Syrup Recipes

glass jar of lavender syrup with gift tag

Lavender Simple Syrup

Yield: 1 cup
Prep Time: 2 minutes
Cook Time: 20 minutes
Additional Time: 30 minutes
Total Time: 52 minutes

This homemade lavender syrup adds subtle floral notes to both hot and cold beverages! Use it to make cozy lattes and dreamy cocktails, or package it up to give as a gift for the holidays!

Ingredients

  • 3 Tablespoons lavender buds
  • 1 cup granulated sugar (or sub coconut sugar)
  • 1 cup water

Instructions

  1. In a sauce pan, combine lavender buds and water. Bring the mixture to a boil, then add the sugar.
  2. Lower the heat so it maintains a gentle boil, and continue to stir until the sugar is dissolved.
  3. Lower the heat to a simmer and allow to simmer for 15 minutes.
  4. Turn off the heat and allow the lavender to steep as it cools. Taste the syrup after 15 minutes. If it has enough flavor, go ahead and strain out the lavender buds. If you want it stronger, continue to steep. I find 20-30 minutes is usually perfect for me.

Notes

If using fresh lavender, choose buds that are bright purple, but not yet open.

Syrup should be stored in an airtight container in the fridge. Use within 2-3 weeks.

Nutrition Information:
Yield: 8 Serving Size: 1
Amount Per Serving: Calories: 97Total Fat: 0gSaturated Fat: 0gTrans Fat: 0gUnsaturated Fat: 0gCholesterol: 0mgSodium: 1mgCarbohydrates: 25gFiber: 0gSugar: 25gProtein: 0g

Please note nutritional information for my recipes is calculated by a third party service and provided as a courtesy to my readers. For the most accurate calculation, I always recommend running the numbers yourself with the specific products you use.

Did you make this recipe?

Leave a review, or head over to Instagram and share a photo! Tag your projects with #neighborfoodies!

lavender bud on top of a glass jar

6 Comments

  1. I am making this right now and was wondering if I can add vanilla extract to the syrup once it’s cooled down? Or will it taste bitter?

    1. You definitely can! I would add it when it’s still a bit warm. We do this with our vanilla syrup, and it tastes great!

    1. I’m sorry, I don’t! I thought I made it in Canva, but I couldn’t find it in my projects. You can do tags pretty quickly with Canva though!

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